Dinesh D’Souza on ‘2000 Mules’: ‘When You Watch This Movie You Realize You’re Actually an Eyewitness to an Organized Coordinated Criminal Operation’

Filmmaker Dinesh D’Souza said Monday his new film 2000 Mules features official surveillance video that allows viewers to “realize you’re actually an eyewitness to an organized coordinated criminal operation” to commit voter fraud.

D’Souza, a guest on Connecticut WTIC NewsTalk 1080’s The Todd Feinburg Show, spoke to afternoon host Feinburg about the release of his new documentary, 2000 Mules (trailer below), in 300 theaters on May 2 and May 4. The film’s in-home virtual premiere will be May 7, and, following that, it will be available for digital download on Rumble’s platform Locals and Salem Media’s platform SalemNow.

The “beauty” of his film is it is now “settling the issue” about voter fraud in the 2020 election, D’Souza said.

“[W]e’re going from unsupported assertions and speculations and anomalies, to what actually happened,” he summarized. “And it’s not just that we say it, it’s not just that we appeal to geo-tracking. We have a whole bunch of video in the movie, obtained by True the Vote, official surveillance video from the states themselves. You can actually see the mules shoving in ballot, after ballot, after ballot, after ballot, into these mail and drop boxes.”

“The term mule is now commonly used in drug trafficking and sex trafficking,” D’Souza noted. “The mule is the middleman, the guy who makes the transport. My friend Catherine Engelbrecht, who runs the election intelligence organization True the Vote, borrowed this term to apply it to the paid political operatives who engage in ballot trafficking.”

Feinburg noted the film’s mention of the use of “geo-tracking” to evaluate the theory that the 2020 presidential election was rigged.

The filmmaker responded that True the Vote “specializes” in geo-tracking.

“So, they spent a couple of million dollars to buy the cellphone geolocation data from the key swing states in the weeks leading up to the election – so, October 1 of 2020 through Election Day 2020,” he explained. “And they bought a huge amount of data – 10 trillion pings – and then they ran a search algorithm, basically looking for mules.”

D’Souza described further about how “mules” operate:

A mule is basically a paid operative who is hired to deliver illegal and fraudulent votes to mail-in drop boxes to go from one drop box to another, to another, to another, dumping in votes in each of these drop boxes. But, the thing is, when you do that, your cellphone will show you going from point A, to B, to C, to D. So, by looking at this geolocation data, True the Vote was able to search. Let’s just look for “mules,” for people, for cellphones, that are going to 10 or more drop boxes. And that’s a very big number, right? Because you may have an innocent reason to go to two, but nobody has an innocent reason to go to 10. And, so, what True the Vote was able to find is, in Atlanta, about 240 mules, in Phoenix, another 200, in Philadelphia, 1,100. There were a bunch in Milwaukee, a bunch in Detroit. You add it up, and then you get the minimum number of “2000 mules” that forms the title of this movie.

One “mule” from Arizona who had been “busted” and had decided to cooperate with police, agreed to be interviewed for his film, D’Souza said, but demanded a disguised voice and appearance due to safety concerns.

“And what do you learn from this … as you investigate?” Feinburg asked. “Does this make it seem obvious to you? How would you judge what you come away with from the film?”

“Well, what we come away with is this, and that is you’ve got these activist organizations, typically on the Left, they’re deeply embedded in the inner city,” D’Souza replied. “And, so, they’re very closely connected to housing projects, homeless shelters, nursing homes, places like that – by the way, all places which are fertile places for getting ballots.”

The filmmaker explained the mules “don’t come up with their own ballots.”

“Typically, what you’re showing, if you watch the geo-tracking, they’re picking up the ballots at a stash house,” he continued. “Then they’re going on a route, kind of like the mailman from one drop box to another, to drop these ballots off. And it’s when you see the video that clinches the case.”

D’Souza said the surveillance video, for example, shows “a guy in a hoodie jumping out of a car.”

“By the way, he’ll park the car in the middle of the street,” he said. “Why? Because it’s 3 a.m. in the morning, and then he’ll look around, make sure no one’s looking. You’ll see him pull his backpack, he’s got a bunch of ballots. You’ll notice he’s wearing gloves. Why? Because he doesn’t want to leave fingerprints on the ballots.”

“And, then, he starts dumping them into the box,” he continued. “And then he takes a phone out, very strange, and takes a photo of the ballots going in the box. Now, again, who does that? Right? It’s not … ‘I voted,’ but he needs to show that he was there, and he needs to get paid. He’s being paid for ballots, and, so, all these little details come together when you watch this movie, and you realize you’re actually an eyewitness to an organized coordinated criminal operation.”

“Election fraud is the most censored topic in the country,” D’Souza told Feinburg.

“I mean, they censor the trans issue,” D’Souza continued. “They censor abortion, climate change, COVID. But no topic is more rigorously censored than election fraud. Now, sometimes they’ll let it slip if someone puts it up. But if I put it up, this gives them a golden opportunity to ban me permanently.”

The filmmaker asserted that his latest documentary “is not really a film about Trump.”

“I mean, he appears briefly in it,” he explained. “It’s really about the honesty of the electoral process, because you know, ever since 2020, on both sides, you get claims about the election that are simply preposterous and cannot be supported”:

So, on the Left, they’ll say it’s the most secure election in history. And all you have to ask is, how do you know? And there’s almost no answer to that. They’ll say, “Well, where’s your proof of election fraud?” Well, let’s say I have no proof. Does that make it the most secure election in history? How do we know it was more secure than 2016? Or 2012? Or 2008? Or 2004? Have you done a comparison to show me what the volume of fraud was in each? No one’s even done that! So, what I’m getting at is the absolute low level of intellect behind these pompous assertions kind of frustrated me.

And then, on the Right, you have people who say, “Yeah, you know, I suspect fraud, I can’t prove it. I can’t put my finger on it, but I know it must have happened.” And, see, that, to me, is inadequate also.

The filmmaker summarized why his film is important.

“I think this is so critical, you know, to get our basic rights, the right to free speech, the right to equal treatment under the law,” D’Souza said. “I mean, think about if you don’t have a free and fair election, we’re basically you know, a criminal junta, you know, masquerading as a democracy.”

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Susan Berry, PhD, is national education editor at The Star News Network. Email tips to [email protected]

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One Thought to “Dinesh D’Souza on ‘2000 Mules’: ‘When You Watch This Movie You Realize You’re Actually an Eyewitness to an Organized Coordinated Criminal Operation’”

  1. Dorrie Gillingham

    That film should be on the internet … probably on RUMBLE, so EVERYONE can view it. It isn’t in a theater anywhere near where I love. It needs to be on RUMBLE!!

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