Campus Speech Police Update: One Professor Investigated for Tweet Reclaims Job as Another Loses His

After more than four months in limbo, constitutional law professor Ilya Shapiro has been cleared to take the reins of Georgetown Law’s Center for the Constitution.

The university had placed the libertarian legal scholar on paid leave in January for his clumsily worded “lesser black woman” tweet about President Biden’s pledge to consider only black women in his search for a successor to retiring Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.

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Commentary: Five Times Pro-Life Advocates Fought for Their Beliefs on Campus in 2021

Even at religiously affiliated institutions, pro-life students fight to have their voices heard peacefully.

Below are five times in 2021 that pro-life advocates overcame adversity on college campuses.

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Brown University Students Overwhelmingly Vote in Favor of Reparations for Black Students

Brown University

On Monday, Students at the Ivy League school Brown University voted in favor of two resolutions approving reparations for black students, as reported by the Washington Free Beacon.

Both resolutions seek to identify any black students who are direct descendants of slaves, or “who were entangled with and/or afflicted by the University and Brown family and their associates,” in reference to the university’s founder Nicholas Brown Jr.

One resolution would give priority admission to any such black students, while the other would give direct monetary payments to said students. In the vote amongst all students on campus, the admissions resolution received 89 percent of the vote, while the financial payment resolution received 85 percent. The vote was held after the student government at Brown passed a resolution, introduced by the student government president Jason Carroll, “calling upon Brown to attempt to identify and reparate the descendants of slaves entangled with the university.”

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Columbia University to Offer Graduation Ceremonies Based on Race, Ethnicity, Income

Next month, Columbia University will hold six additional graduation ceremonies for undergraduate students according to their race and other aspects of how they identify.

The six virtual ceremonies were announced by Columbia’s Multicultural Affairs department.

Native, Asian, “Latinx” and Black special events are listed as options where students can register, as well as a Lavender graduation for the LGBTQ community, and a ceremony for first-generation and low-income students, USA Today reports.

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