Cartels Using Video Games to Recruit Scouts for the Border

New reports claim that Mexican cartels are now turning to online video games to recruit potential new scouts for the southern border.

According to the Daily Caller, the Mexican cyber police claim that there have already been at least 30 confirmed cases of attempted recruitments on video games. Cartels are targeting gamers and bribing them with cash payments, using a careful assortment of letters and numbers to spell out key words without facing bans for using the words directly. For example, they will use “n4arc0” instead of “narcos,” “c4rt3ls,” instead of “cartels,” and “zic4ri0s” instead of “sicarios.” Such recruiters also wait for confirmation that the gamers are alone, without their parents nearby, before approaching them.

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Goliad Sheriff: Cartels Are Preparing for Influx of People Never Seen Before in U.S. History

Border Patrol agents and Texas law enforcement officers are bracing for as many as 500,000 illegal immigrants waiting in Mexico to enter Texas in the Rio Grande Valley Sector once Title 42 is lifted, Goliad County Sheriff Roy Boyd told The Center Square in an exclusive interview.

The Rio Grande Valley Sector, one of 20 U.S. Customs and Border Protection sectors, stretches from the Gulf of Mexico south of Brownsville west to the eastern tip of Falcon Lake in Starr County. RGV Sector Border Patrol agents are tasked with patrolling over 320 river miles, 250 coastal miles and 19 counties equating to more than 17,000 square miles in the busiest sector along the southern border.

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Commentary: Migration Crisis Is a Battle of Americanists Against Transformationists

The ongoing mass illegal migration crisis is best understood as an existential conflict between two forces: Americanists vs. Transformationists. These forces, in turn, represent two competing regimes or ways of life. But first, let us review what has been going on at the U.S.-Mexico border since Joe Biden’s inauguration.

The September surge of thousands of illegal Haitian border crossers from Chile and Brazil camped under an international bridge in Del Rio, Texas is simply the latest debacle in the never-ending migration crisis. Month after month, day after day, the border between the United States and Mexico becomes more porous, more chaotic, more lawless, and more violent. Nine months after January 20 there is no end in sight as record numbers of illegal migrants pour into the United States. In early October both NBC News and the Daily Mail reported that, according to the Department of Homeland Security, up to 400,000 illegal migrants could cross the border this month, doubling the 21-year record set in July. 

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