‘White Allies/Accomplices’ Participate Separately from BIPOC Staff in University of Colorado at Boulder Diversity Program

The University of Colorado at Boulder is hosting monthly “BIPOC Identity” and “White Ally” meetups this semester that separate attendees based on race.

Specifically, The “monthly meetups,” which the Institute of Cognitive Science and the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences sponsors, comprise groups for “Black, Indigenous or other people of color” and another for “white allies/accomplices.”

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‘Non-Partisan’ Colorado Newsline Editor Quentin Young Demands Eliminating University’s Conservative Scholar Program

In his recently published op-ed, Colorado Newsline editor Quentin Young has one demand for the University of Colorado Boulder: eliminate the school’s dedicated conservative teaching position.

Every year since 2013, the Conservative Thought and Policy Program at CU Boulder brings one scholar to campus to discuss conservative thought in the fields of “policy, military, and media communities, among others.”

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‘The Numbers Are Skewed’: Colorado Officials Warn of Inflated COVID Death Statistics

Multiple public officials in Colorado are warning that the state’s official COVID-19 death count is skewed due to the practice of conflating patients who have died directly due to the disease with those who have merely tested positive for it prior to death.

Data experts and health officials have long struggled to separate out those two key data points in government tallies of COVID deaths, leading to accusations that the death rate for the disease is being inflated modestly or even significantly.

Multiple public officials in Colorado, meanwhile, told “Full Measure” host Sharyl Attkisson that they had personally observed death tallies that erred on the side of COVID, leading to death counts that were effectively misleading to the public.

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Colorado High School Students Stage Walkout to Protest School Mask Requirement

High school students in Douglas County, Colorado, staged protests Wednesday calling for the end of a classroom mask mandate, ABC 7 Denver reported.

Students from ThunderRidge High School walked out of class around 9:30 a.m. in protest of the classroom mask requirement, ABC 7 reported.

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Biden Gears Up for Renewed Fight Against Oil and Gas

A federal judge has ruled the Biden administration must resume allowing oil and gas leasing on federal land and waters, but the administration is saying it will not go down without a fight.

The Biden administration said it will appeal a court ruling allowing the leases, the latest development in a months-long battle between President Joe Biden and the oil and gas industry, even as gas prices continue to rise.

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Denver Spends More on Homeless Than Schools and Police

Denver spent twice as much money on its homeless population than it did on its students and police, a Common Sense Institute August report showed.

The city spent between $41,679 and $104,201 per person on its homeless population, compared to $19,202 per student in K-12 public schools in 2020, according to the report. In total it spent $481 million on healthcare, housing and other services for homeless people, over $100 million more than the Department of Public Safety’s budget.

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Census Bureau Announces States in the South, Northwest Pick up Congressional Seats

Texas and Florida are slated to gain congressional seats during the decennial redistricting process, while California and New York are set to each lose one, the U.S. Census Bureau announced Monday.

The U.S. Census Bureau released the decennial state population and congressional apportionment totals Monday, outlining how many districts each state will have for the next decade. The data also determines how many Electoral College votes each state will have through 2032, and allocates how federal money is distributed to each state for schools, roads and other public projects.

The release was originally scheduled for December, but faced delays due to the coronavirus pandemic and the Trump administration’s unsuccessful effort to exclude non-citizens from the count.

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How Georgia’s Voting Law Compares to Seven Blue, Purple States’ Laws

Flag with ballot form

Democrats have repeatedly denounced the new Georgia election integrity law that requires IDs for absentee ballots, but seldom criticize blue states that have comparable laws on their books—or in some cases, laws making it more difficult to vote than in Georgia.

“Overall, the Georgia law is pretty much in the mainstream and is not regressive or restrictive,” Jason Snead, executive director of the Honest Elections Project, told The Daily Signal. “The availability of absentee ballots and early voting is a lot more progressive than what’s in blue states.”

Here’s a look at how the new Georgia election law stacks up to voting laws in Democrat-leaning blue states.

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MLB Moves All-Star Game to State that Requires Voter ID

After ditching Atlanta in protest over a new voter integrity law which requires voters to present identification if they wish to vote absentee, Major League Baseball decided to move its All-Star game to Colorado, a state that also requires voter ID. 

In order to register to vote in Colorado, voters are required by law to present some form of government issued identification. The only exception to that rule is a current “utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows the name and address of the elector,” with “current” defined as issued within the previous 60 days before registering to vote. 

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Donald Trump Says Georgia’s Voter Integrity Law Didn’t Go Far Enough, Faults Brian Kemp and Geoff Duncan

Former U.S. President Donald Trump criticized Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan this week and suggested Democrats in the state got the better of them. “Too bad the desperately needed election reforms in Georgia didn’t go further, as their originally approved bill did, but the governor and lieutenant governor would not go for it. The watered-down version, that was just passed and signed by Governor Kemp, while better than before, doesn’t have signature matching and many other safety measures, which were sadly left out. This bill should have been passed before the 2020 Presidential Election, not after,” Trump said in a written statement.

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Colorado Joins Growing List of States Who Pledge to Dedicate Their Electoral Votes to the Winner of the Popular Vote

Colorado residents approved a measure Wednesday to join a list of states pledging to award their electoral votes to the presidential candidate who obtains the majority of the popular vote.

Proposition 113 passed with roughly 52% approval from voters, entering Colorado into the Interstate Popular Vote Compact, according to the Denver Post. The state joins 15 other jurisdictions across the U.S., including California, Illinois, New York and Washington, according to the compact’s website.

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Security Guard to Face 2nd-Degree Murder Charges in Denver Shooting

A private security guard who claimed self-defense will face a second-degree murder charge in connection with the shooting death of a man following political rallies last weekend, the Denver district attorney’s office said Thursday.

Matthew Dolloff, 30, will be charged on Monday for killing Lee Keltner, said Denver District Attorney Beth McCann. If convicted, Dolloff, faces up to 48 years in prison, ABC News reports.

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